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Impacted Tooth Exposure

Help Impacted Teeth Emerge Into the Dental Arch and Function Properly

Impaction refers to teeth that are stuck beneath the gums, and it most often occurs to wisdom teeth and canine teeth. A variety of situations can result in an impacted tooth, including the presence of an obstruction blocking the tooth’s growth path or baby teeth not falling out in time. In cases of wisdom teeth, these third molars can simply be removed to prevent issues. Canine teeth, however, are vital to the development of your bite and tooth alignment, which is why an impacted canine tooth should be guided into its proper place with an expose and bond procedure.

Causes and Risks of an Impacted Canine

Typically, canines begin developing around the age of 10 and finish growing in the following few years. Common causes for canine impaction include:

  • There are too many teeth in the dental arch.
  • The baby teeth aren’t falling out.
  • A bone or growth is blocking the canine’s eruption path.

It is very rare for an impacted canine tooth to erupt naturally into the dental arch. Leaving an impacted tooth untreated can result in cysts, tumors, pain or stiffness, and even gum disease. These teeth can be difficult to properly clean, which can cause cavities or infections. Early detection is key, which is why it’s crucial to regularly visit your dentist for cleanings and evaluations.

The Expose and Bond Procedure

During your first visit, we will likely take 3D CBCT scans to get a clearer picture of your dental structures. We will also answer any questions you may have and determine the right anesthesia or sedation option for your procedure.

We most commonly address impacted canines with exposure and bonding, a process that involves our oral surgery team and your orthodontist. If necessary, your doctor will extract any remaining baby teeth that may be blocking the canine’s path. Treatment begins when your orthodontist places your braces, which will create the space needed for the canine’s eruption. When the rest of your teeth have moved out of the way, your oral surgeon will expose the canine in the gums and bond a bracket and chain to it. Your orthodontist then uses the chain to pull the canine down into its proper position slowly.

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Questions? Let Us Know

We’re here for you. If you ever have questions about your treatment or would like to know more about procedures, payment information, or anything else, please reach out to us at any time.